Big Boss or Big Brother? Top 5 employee monitoring systems.

The research confirms it: companies that use employee data to inform their business decisions are more competitive and earn higher returns than their less technologically advanced – and less morally ambiguous – competitors. Without a doubt, it’s in a company’s best interest to gather data and monitor their employees. But any company, to be profitable and sustainable, must be built upon trust, culture, and a clear vision. No one wants to work in – or invest in, or lead – an office built on suspicion. So how do you balance increased revenue with decreased sentiment? Depending on your goals, your company, and your culture, there are a number of different softwares you can purchase, ranging from the Orwellian ever-watching eye, to the less threatening website filters or anonymous data collection tools. Before picking your employee surveillance system, ask yourself th...
READ MORE

Details

The Politics of Talking Politics in the Office

Despite the political climate in which we’re currently enmeshed, talking politics in the office is still inexplicably taboo. You’d think that something so incredibly public – played out on TV screens and during family dinners across the country – would by now be acceptable office fodder. And yet, to announce your preferred party or to ally with a certain position is considered distasteful at best, offensive at worst. There is a reason for this – not everyone in an office will share the same beliefs, and mutual respect is at the foundation of any good workplace. Civility, politeness, and common courtesy cannot be overemphasized in a well-functioning office. But who does it benefit, to categorically ignore some of the most influential discussions of our time? Is this ‘silencing’ not more detrimental than considering the topics openly and respectfully? What we’re really asking is: should the office be a refuge from political dram...
READ MORE

Details

Stop searching for passion: how to find meaning in any career.

Too often, passion is coded as some kind of inborn motivator, planted within you from birth and destined to follow you, unchanging, throughout your life. Yet in reality, passion is just as easily ‘created’ as it is ‘discovered.’ The epithet ‘follow your passions’ has always been a (mis)guiding force for young professionals as they embark on their chosen career path – or as they commit, yet again, to a path that has consistently failed to prove its value. With the right conditions, you can find passion and fulfillment in almost any career. Read on to find your passion – no matter what you do.

What do you really want?

Most people aren’t lucky enough – or maybe they’re actually the lucky ones? – to be born with an explicit, well-defined, commodifiable passion. In fact, it’s rare that passion is attached to a specific activity at all; it’s more often a product of how that activity makes you feel. What you w...
READ MORE

Details

How to deal with an unmanageable manager.

Aside from compensation, people generally quit their jobs for one of two reasons – a lack of upward mobility and growth, or a negative relationship with a superior. To absolutely no one’s surprise, Harvard Business Review finds that the stronger your positive work relationships, the better you’ll perform. In a similar study, HBR reports that those who are generally happier at work score higher on productivity metrics. So for the sake of your job, your sanity, and your well-being, it’s in your best interest to forge a mutually-beneficial relationship with your colleagues – and, most importantly perhaps, with your boss.  But what can you do, when you’ve found a job you love but a manager you find…unmanageable? Start small, ask yourself a few key questions, ...
READ MORE

Details

Supreme Court Justices and the one type of Diversity everyone seems to ignore.

Every Supreme Court Justice before 1967 was a white man. That’s the year Thurgood Marshall was appointed the first African American Justice. Still, no women were voted in until 1981, when Sandra Day O’Connor claimed her spot on the court. Comparatively, today’s Supreme Court is impressively diverse.
  • Three women – Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1993), Sonia Sotomayor (2009), and Elena Kagan (2010) – offer a sharp female perspective, absent until 1981.
  • The addition of Clarence Thomas (1991) and Sonia Sotomayor (2009) provide much-needed representation for the African American and Hispanic communities, respectively.
  • Three of the nine sitting Justices are Jewish, the remaining six Roman Catholic.
So what’s the problem? It seems that in only fifty-odd years we’ve transformed the highest court in the land from a homogeneous slice of white bread into a representative panel of dynamic cultures, experiences, and perspectives. And yet ...
READ MORE

Details

The 10 trendiest offices in San Diego

Gone are the days of windowless cubicles; today’s spaces are all about open air layouts, coffee shops and speakeasies on campus, and indoor/outdoor gathering points. Smart companies across San Diego are marrying ‘fun’ with ‘utility’ to develop breathtaking workplaces that stimulate you to do your best work – and be your best self. It goes without saying that physical space and personal happiness are intimately linked. Ample research supports this claim; Harvard Business Review connects physical environments to mood, productivity, and personal well-being – and companies are taking note. Check out these 10 San Diego businesses taking office space to the next level:

1. UE.co, B2B software company

At UE, nothing is taken for granted: every public space, social gathering spot, and office is devised with an eye for detail. READ MORE

Details

  • Posted By: 10.04.2018
  • By: Proven Recruiting's Editorial Team
  • In: Job Seekers
  • 1 Comments

What they don’t tell you about recruiting.

Here’s what they never tell you; recruiting is not a numbers game, or a modern matchmaking service, or a sales job. Recruiting, done properly, is a matter of emotional intelligence. Few people go to school for recruiting – probably because, despite the growing need in our global economy for recruiters, there’s no degree that can teach you how to properly measure a person’s drive, motivation, or potential. The closest such degree would be psychology, or maybe social work: anything that can help clue you into the intellectual drivers for peoples’ behavior. A person’s resume is only the beginning of the story. It tells you if a candidate has the skills to do the job, without making any judgment about whether they’d excel at it. This is something you have to determine, and it’s an emotional dexterity that is only developed after talking with hundreds – maybe thousands – of job-seekers. Before becoming a recruiter, here's what you'll want to ask yoursel...
READ MORE

Details

Going corporate – what to expect & how to excel

Overwhelmed, intimidated, out of place. I’ve been there: coming from a non-traditional work environment, where I spent 6 years working as a uniform-wearing, hourly-paid, customer-facing employee, I wasn’t sure what to expect when I accepted my first corporate office job with Proven Recruiting.    There are certain things you can do to succeed in corporate, and the faster you figure them out, the better your chances of sticking around. Our fears rarely match reality, and - as you may have guessed - the transition was far less scary than I’d made it out to be. But that’s not to say that there wasn’t a significant adjustment period; everything I knew about work had to be rethought and relearned. READ MORE

Details

How to ace your next interview, according to San Diego’s top Finance and Accounting recruiter

Google ‘interview prep’ and you’ll find a lot of lists - lists of potential prompts, lists of common mistakes, lists of questions to ask, lists of lists. But not everything can be filtered down into an easy-to-digest checklist. Some things - the most important things, usually - need a little extra detail. When it comes to interviewing, you don’t want to leave your hiring manager with a superficial catalog of your skills and experience. If 5 years of recruiting has taught me nothing else, it’s that stories are your friend. Focus on core themes, use narrative, and be specific. READ MORE

Details

The anatomy of a thank you note – what you need to write to get hired.

You already said what you had to say – and expressed your profuse gratitude – in the interview itself. Why should you take the time to rehash what’s already been clearly spelled out? Is a Thank You note really necessary? The short answer is yes; the Thank You note is a lot more than an antiquated tradition. A recent CNBC report reveals that, despite hiring experts saying the Thank You note is ‘critical,’ only 25% of entry-level applicants actually send thank you notes after interviews. Still think they’re unnecessary? A client of mine - a CFO at one of the fastest growing companies in DFW - goes so far as to closely monitor not only ...
READ MORE

Details