How-to guide: writing engaging job posts

Failing to spark someone’s interest in the span of a few short seconds can mean a perfectly qualified professional will skip your job and apply for another. Writing fun, smart, incisive job posts is part of our everyday work as recruiters. Given that it takes, on average, 80+ days to fill a professional role, you can’t afford to miss out on the right person. We’ve developed a system to make each post unique and engaging without the need to spend unnecessary time or energy crafting a literary masterpiece for every role. Here’s how it works: First, consider the big picture

Branding

Job posts don’t exist in a vacuum - they’re a vital extension of your company that will be seen and judged by thousands of people in your industry. Maintainin...
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5 proven ways to increase diversity hiring

Hiring for diversity doesn’t happen by accident. Left to their own devices, most companies will simply replicate their current workforce, whatever that means for them. It’s only natural for Managers, Directors, and Executives to want to surround themselves with that which is familiar - to do otherwise requires concerted effort, strategy, and self-awareness. That’s where the Diversity Hiring Checklist comes in. This checklist has worked for us and for the companies we work with. If you follow it carefully, it will help you quickly boost your diversity efforts and start to effect real change:

The Diversity Hiring Checklist

1. Create an original diversity statement

It doesn’t need to be complex, but it does need to be unique to your company. Retire ...
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Changing careers later in life (from someone who did it)

Unless you’ve made your way to the C-suite, you’re unlikely to find many articles addressing the successes, struggles, and challenges of the older worker. Little is written about us, save for the occasional anti-ageism piece published mostly for public image purposes. So when I decided to leave my career in Real Estate at the age of 45, I was largely without guidance. Of course, I had my family as support and the Internet as a general - if often lacking - resource, but I didn’t have an article like this one. Which is why I’m creating it.

Late-life career changes aren’t doomed to failure

82% of respondents to an American Institute for Economic Research survey reported making a successful transition to a new career after the age of 45. You probably aren’t doing the same job you dreamed of as a kid, or even the same job you did 10-20 years ago. Why stop evolvi...
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The death of the pre-employment marijuana test

While drug tests may have, at some point, served as a litmus test for which people are dedicated, focused, and – with no better way to put it – law-abiding, it is now an expendable and potentially unethical measure that does little but limit your candidate pool. To be clear, Proven Recruiting does not condone drug use of any kind. I’ve built a company that is fiercely dedicated to employees’ well-being. And yet, this company – a company whose sole purpose is to identify and engage talented professionals – does not drug test our internal workers. From a business perspective, it doesn’t make sense to unquestioningly reject a huge portion of the population - especially in today’s tight labor market. A 2018 Gallup poll found that two-thirds of Americans favor legalizing marijuana. While it’s unlikely two-thirds of Americans actually ...
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We tried the gender decoder, and the results surprised us.

On the surface, the Gender Decoder seems like an invaluable tool. It helps pinpoint hard-to-identify gendered terms and excise them from your job post lexicon. Based on research from the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the software highlights how gendered wording in job posts can propagate inequality by inadvertently excluding one sex or the other. But what happens when words like ‘challenge’ and ‘analyze’ are coded male - and therefore erased from professional job posts? Is that really promoting diversity? As recruiters, we ...
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The Politics of Talking Politics in the Office

Despite the political climate in which we’re currently enmeshed, talking politics in the office is still inexplicably taboo. You’d think that something so incredibly public – played out on TV screens and during family dinners across the country – would by now be acceptable office fodder. And yet, to announce your preferred party or to ally with a certain position is considered distasteful at best, offensive at worst. There is a reason for this – not everyone in an office will share the same beliefs, and mutual respect is at the foundation of any good workplace. Civility, politeness, and common courtesy cannot be overemphasized in a well-functioning office. But who does it benefit, to categorically ignore some of the most influential discussions of our time? Is this ‘silencing’ not more detrimental than considering the topics openly and respectfully? What we’re really asking is: should the office be a refuge from political dram...
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Supreme Court Justices and the one type of Diversity everyone seems to ignore.

Every Supreme Court Justice before 1967 was a white man. That’s the year Thurgood Marshall was appointed the first African American Justice. Still, no women were voted in until 1981, when Sandra Day O’Connor claimed her spot on the court. Comparatively, today’s Supreme Court is impressively diverse.
  • Three women – Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1993), Sonia Sotomayor (2009), and Elena Kagan (2010) – offer a sharp female perspective, absent until 1981.
  • The addition of Clarence Thomas (1991) and Sonia Sotomayor (2009) provide much-needed representation for the African American and Hispanic communities, respectively.
  • Three of the nine sitting Justices are Jewish, the remaining six Roman Catholic.
So what’s the problem? It seems that in only fifty-odd years we’ve transformed the highest court in the land from a homogeneous slice of white bread into a representative panel of dynamic cultures, experiences, and perspectives. And yet ...
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How we built an award-winning culture + earned a spot on Inc. Magazine’s 2018 Best Workplaces

What makes people choose to work for your company over your competitors? Why, when so many other offers exist, do candidates accept yours? According to Quantum Workplace, the best benefits aren't usually physical - people prefer flex hours, a casual environment, and a clear mission statement to food in the fridge or a fancy gym. Again and again, research shows that giving your workers something to believe in can be more valuable than salary or bonuses alone. At Proven Recruiting, we pride ourselves on the close-kn...
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Why You’re Not Attracting More Female Candidates

Depending on your industry, it can range from extremely easy – doctors, social workers, veterinarians – to extremely hard – software engineers, statisticians, data scientists – to identify and retain female professionals. While women comprise nearly 50% of the US workforce, they make up just 24% of STEM workers. But women aren’t an impenetrable black box of motivations and desires, their needs unknowable and their job search patterns random. Their drives are, in fact, quite easily discernable – if only you make the effort to listen. Stop losing out to your competition or lagging behind your industry. With the talent shortage growing every day, the need to attract, hire, and support fema...
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The Definitive Guide to Networking: Before. During. After.

There’s a reason people, myself included, avoid networking at all costs. It’s painful, awkward, and often fruitless. That is, if you go in without a plan. My last article, 'How Networking Will Change Your Life (& Drive Your Sales),’ made a broad case for networking – drawing on stats like the fact that 70% of jobs are found through personal connections. In Part II of this series, we’ll be diving into the juicy stuff; the real-life tips you can utilize before, during and after your event to exponentially grow your network...
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