Changing careers later in life (from someone who did it)

Unless you’ve made your way to the C-suite, you’re unlikely to find many articles addressing the successes, struggles, and challenges of the older worker. Little is written about us, save for the occasional anti-ageism piece published mostly for public image purposes. So when I decided to leave my career in Real Estate at the age of 45, I was largely without guidance. Of course, I had my family as support and the Internet as a general - if often lacking - resource, but I didn’t have an article like this one. Which is why I’m creating it.

Late-life career changes aren’t doomed to failure

82% of respondents to an American Institute for Economic Research survey reported making a successful transition to a new career after the age of 45. You probably aren’t doing the same job you dreamed of as a kid, or even the same job you did 10-20 years ago. Why stop evolvi...
READ MORE

Details

Is Conscious Competence the Key to Success?

Is your company talking about ‘Unconscious Incompetence’ yet? This learning-related phenomenon is a growing concern for employers, and it’s likely impacting the long-term success of your career. The term refers to an invisible, creeping decline of skills and knowledge that occurs throughout every level of a company’s workforce. As technologies change, products and services evolve, and employees – particularly those who are 10+ years out of college – move further away from formal education, individuals’ relative competencies tend to decrease. A lack of awareness allows this decline to grow exponentially, and individuals, teams, and entire companies can become unconsciously incompetent as a result. Simply put, Unconscious Incompetence stems from all of the things that you (and your coworkers) don’t know that you don’t know. And what you don’t know can harm you. So how can you keep up with critical skills that you don’t know you lack?

S...
READ MORE

Details

Saved by Generation Z

There’s a new kid on the block going by Generation Z. In just five years, this generation - currently toddlers to adolescents - will be the fastest growing and most influential group in the job market. Born into an age of intense innovation and change, and having never experienced a time before the Internet or cell phones, this digitally-savvy generation sees the world as a fluid network of remotely accessible and widely connected information. They’re accustomed to immediate answers and are not scared by a bit of online research. Check out the list below to get the inside scoop on your future workforce. At a maximum age of 21 (born 1996), many of Generation Z’s characteristics are yet to be revealed. Here’s what we do know...
READ MORE

Details