Go Small or Go Home: Life After Public Accounting

Three years in Public Accounting had me seriously considering my options. A few things I knew for sure:
  • I wanted to stay in the finance and accounting realm
  • I wanted to move into industry
  • I didn’t want to sacrifice career progress
I was left asking myself a few key questions - where could I have the most influence? How could I earn access to top leadership? What would give me a deeper purpose? And finally, how could I best leverage the skills and knowledge I developed in Public Accounting (read my article on leaving Public here)? After speaking with a former colleague – then working at Microsoft – the choice between big fish, little pond and big pond, little fish became clear. According to her, huge public companies like Microsoft rarely gave their Accountants a holistic, big-picture view; instead, accountants tackled disparate parts of the business without e...
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How I hit a record performance in my first year as a working mom

My colleagues and friends will tell you that compromise has never been my strong suit; I’ve always believed in either doing something to the absolute best of my ability or not doing it at all. Throughout my career that has led to working 60+ hour weeks, never taking a full day off, and consistently pushing myself to be the best I can be. After my first born, I continued to find success. I actually (shocking even myself!) had my highest earning year ever. All it took was an exhausting amount of dedication, sleepless months, a very careful balancing act, and a well-established support system. Simple enough, right? Of course sacrifices had to be made, but I decided that neither my career nor my relationship with my daughter would be compromised. Instead of sacrificing my job, I expanded my life. I’m now pregnant with my second child and struggling to prepare for the demands of two children, a challenging career, and a husband who travels 24/7. How can I best take care of my d...
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5 free tools that changed my life

In 1992, I was 23 years old, broker than broke, and completely unsure of my place in the world. I graduated from American University in Washington, DC, and had $50,000+ in student debt. The only job I could land was selling Plymouths. For you millennials, that was the Tesla of my youth.

Back then, I couldn’t see a future where I wasn’t poor and struggling. It was a very uncertain time in my life and the lack of clear passion, path, or mentor only caused more anxiety.

It took me about 4 years to work through the self-doubt, but I eventually started to discover what I liked and didn’t like as I reached my late 20s.

Following are 5 free tools that helped me transform from constant self-doubt to being (more) comfortable in my own skin. 

1. Youtube and po...
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The right way to leave public accounting

Every year a new class of graduates convinces themselves that their experience in Public Accounting will be different. Manageable. Maybe exhilarating. Five years ago, I was one of them. Like many, my initial plan was to stay until Manager. But after two years, the sleepless nights, no weekends, and a quickly developing anxiety disorder were catching up with me. That, coupled with the most stressful Busy Season of my life, had me considering my options. I wanted my work to mean something more, and I wanted my ‘off the clock’ time to be…existent. Can you relate? Finding a new job was surprisingly easy. The hard part came after – when I realized how little I actually knew of life outside of Public Accounting. If you’re considering leaving Public, make sure you have all the facts: 1. You need to retrain your brain

Consider this: you have an AP Specialist asking for help in resolving a certain issue –...
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The surprising benefits of workplace nemeses

An office without some level of disaccord is essentially impossible; it seems to be a rule of nature that every Jim has a Dwight. And it’s easy to see that as a negative - especially if your workplace rival has an annoying tendency to roll their eyes or speak over you in meetings. Here’s the thing: a simple mindset shift can help you to not only outshine your competition, but to drastically increase your workplace satisfaction while reducing unnecessary anxiety. Many people talk about the value of workplace friends - few discuss the benefits of workplace enemies. Follow these tips to make the most of your rivals. The basis of workplace competition. Competition at work isn’t just inevitable - it’s actively encouraged. READ MORE

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There’s no better time to become a consultant. Here’s why.

If there was a way to maintain your professional freedom and stay true to your goals, all while adding to your resume - would you do it?

At least 1 in 5 Americans are already getting in on the gig economy. Recent studies show that as much as 34% of the US labor force are contract workers, and that number is only growing. As bespoke services and hyper-personalization become the norm, the supply of contractors can hardly keep up with demand. Plus, record low unemployment rates are pushing companies to hire more flex workers than ever before.

Depending on yo...
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The unspoken rules of unlimited vacation

New job, new salary, new...vacation policy? More and more, companies are using so-called ‘unlimited vacation’ as a recruitment strategy - but what does it really mean? Are you actually winning in this deal? In all likelihood, yes - you’ll be coming out ahead. Unlimited vacation policies signal a level of trust that few companies are willing to impart. In that sense, you’ve found a good place to build a career. But if you’re already busy mentally planning your next five trips, you may want to think again. It’s a tricky situation - unlimited vacation was likely one of the deciding factors when you accepted your offer, and you certainly want to make good use of it. On the other hand - you don’t want to be that person. Where do you draw the line? READ MORE

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Ingram Losner’s 7 Rules To Live By

Had you asked me 15 years ago if I would be, in a few short years, Co-Founding Proven Recruiting, I would have responded with a resounding no. Predicting the future is near impossible - especially when you are still in the process of discovering your passions and goals. Without the benefit of hindsight, decisions often seem impossible; nothing more than black boxes of unknown consequences. No one should be surprised, given this fact, that 33% of university graduates later regret their chosen majors. Too often, it is only after the fact that we can fu...
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Everything you need to know about life after the Big 4

You landed a job at Deloitte, EY, KPMG or PwC. While initially exciting, reality has set in. Grueling hours, a demanding workload, and a seemingly endless numbers of audits have taken over – and that’s not even during busy season. Sound familiar? For me, landing a job in Big 4 seemed like a massive success - until I actually started working. Quickly, work-life balance became something I read about wistfully while browsing the web at 5am because I’d been stress-dreaming again, and why go to sleep anyway when my alarm is about to sound? It wasn’t a surprise, really. I knew the arduous hours and lack of social life were a known part of the job. Yet even though some accountants thrive in this kind of environment, I – like many – found myself searching for something new, different, inspiring. But where could I go, when my education and sense of success were so wrapped up in the Big 4 ethos? I often mulled the same questions over and over again - What are my options? Is ...
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Retire by 40? It’s surprisingly doable.

1811 hours – that’s the amount of time the average full-time employed American is expected to work this year. Assuming you work from the ages of 25 to 65, you’re facing 72, 440 hours of work before you retire. There are two ways to approach this reality – you can either accept it as fact and strive to find fulfilling employment, or you can reject the premise entirely. Maybe you want to be home with your kids or travel the world as a family. Or perhaps you’re looking for the freedom to start your own business. Maybe, for you, financial independence doesn’t mean no longer working; it means no longer having to work. More and more, people are turning to non-traditional career trajectories to satisfy their adventurous spirits. As the tides of corporate America shift, what was once considered impossible is now becoming attaina...
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